Analysis of the reasons for differences in topical specificity among various species of tick (Acari, Ixodidae) infesting European bison

Authors

  • Joanna N. Izdebska Laboratory of Parasitology and General Zoology, Department of Invertebrate Zoology, University of Gdańsk
  • Krystian Cydzik Laboratory of Parasitology and General Zoology, Department of Invertebrate Zoology, University of Gdańsk

Keywords:

ticks, European bison, deer, parasitism

Abstract

Ixodidae are usually oligoxenic or polyxenic, hematophagous, and periodic parasitic arthropods that occur commonly throughout populations of various vertebrate species, including European bison. Little remains known about how host and topical specificity develop. Ticks are usually showing clear preferences in the choice of location at hosts. On large ungulates ticks are usually noted in the inguinal regions, laterally on the body, and neck. However, in bison, the marsh tick Dermacentor reticulatus is usually located at the tops of the pinnas on bison. The areas of bison skin included in the current study were chosen because either ticks were noted in them or there were distinct changes on the skin that indicated that ticks had fed there previously. The changes resulting from the feeding of various tick species were noted and the bison skin thickness in correlation with the sizes of the ticks’ mouth parts was analyzed. They stated, that gnathosoma adulti of D. reticulatus it is 1.6 – 1.7 times shorter, than of female I. ricinus. Ticks do, however, exhibit distinct topical specificity during feeding. While the reasons for topical specificity vary, it does appear that in the case of D. reticulatus a significant factor is the correlation between the length of the gnathosoma and the skin thickness of the host, which determines the availability of the circulatory vessels.

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Published

2010-09-01

How to Cite

Izdebska, J. N., & Cydzik, K. (2010). Analysis of the reasons for differences in topical specificity among various species of tick (Acari, Ixodidae) infesting European bison. European Bison Conservation Newsletter, 3, 75–84. Retrieved from https://ojs.wisent.org/index.php/czasopismo/article/view/150

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Section

Peer-reviewed articles

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